Research

 

Behavioral Economics & Nudge Policies

My dissertation examines the role of race, class, gender, and disability in the development and application of behavioral economics and nudge policy-making.

Histories of Attention Research

Initially presented at the 2019 4S conference, this work is currently under review for a Science, Technology, and Human Values journal special issue. In this article I look at three paradigms of psychology research on attention, from the late 19th century to today, and how race played an important role in psychological conceptions of controlled versus uncontrolled attention in subjects.

The History and Politics of Digital Wellbeing

This work examines the role of past and present psychological theories on conceptions of digital wellbeing, as well as digital wellbeing interventions. I am currently co-authoring an article for a Communication and Mobile Media Journal special issue with Alex Beattie at Victoria University.

 

A History of Racial Differences in Behavioral Modification Therapies

This manuscript in preparation for review examines the development of behavioral modification therapies and policy during the 1940s to the 1990s. I trace both Black and white psychologists development of behavioral modification on various populations, including urban and incarcerated populations.

Analysis of Contemporary Nonprofit Behavioral Health Interventions

With my partner, medical anthropologist Samantha Streuli, this work in progress will analyze the behavioral science applied to health interventions over the past decade. We pay particular attention to the development of such health interventions in refugee nonprofit organizations.

A Critical Approach to Dual-Process Theories in the Social Sciences

This is a literature review and critical analysis of dual-process theories as developed in psychology. Specifically, I challenge the veracity and applicability of such theories as taken up by certain scholars in sociology, history, anthropology, economics, and political science.

 

Fatphobia in Contemporary Worksite Wellness Programs

This work was initially based on my undergraduate thesis examining the role of implicit “anti-fat bias” in negative penalties to overweight employees in so-called “worksite wellness programs.” While this previous work was largely based on social psychology experiments, my current work explores the role of fatphobia in such programs today.

The Political & Scientific Commentary of Paul Lafargue

Paul Lafargue was a writer and socialist organizer who married Karl Marx’s daughter, Laura. Lafargue is a largely forgotten social theorist, having acted as an interlocutor with various late 19th century political orators and evolutionary scientists. In this work in progress, I analyze Lafargue’s critical commentary on Charles Darwin and Herbert Spencer, as well as his criticism of Western conceptions of progress and productivity, and his support of feminist and Marxist politics. I argue that Lafargue has much to teach us in terms of contemporary debates over sociobiology and evolutionary psychology.

The Psychology and Politics of Free Jazz Musicians

This is ongoing project looking into the psychological, spiritual, and political discourse of American Free Jazz musicians in the 1960s & 1970s. In particular, I look at how the racial politics of the time can be seen in jazz musicians’ speeches, music, print commentary, spiritual and psychological discourse, activism, and professional organization.

Jane Doe